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    Synopsis
    A practical guide for the many moving parts and potential blind spots in commercializing new products and services. It covers dozens of frequently overlooked innovation vulnerabilities.

    Review

    Thoughtful. Clear. Concise. Easy-to-use new cartography.
    --Dr. Elizabeth Danon-Leva, Change Management Strategies, Culture Communications Consultant, U.S.

    The Title and the content are so interesting! Full of insights. I like the book.
    --Eng. Alex Dumas, CEO, L.I.G Energy, and former Member of Parliament, Rwanda

    A shrewd perspective on why some products thrive and others inevitably never leave the egg.
    --Colin Duffy, high school student, and founder & CEO of Coral View, U.S.

    Great work and approach for innovators as product managers, executives, or entrepreneurs.
    --Michael Heflin, COO, Sprout Tiny Homes, U.S.

    Comprehensive and enjoyable view of the whole innovation process.
    --Bill Matthews, Chairman, BBC Pension Trust Limited, U.K.

    Short and concise, very easy to read.
    --Bunsaku Nagai, Country Manager, Technoprobe, Japan


    I really enjoyed reading the book. It was fun, and that says everything.
    --Dr. Gershon Yaniv, CEO, DisperSol Technologies, LLC, U.S.


    About the Author

    I spent over thirty years contributing to global innovations in diverse industries and different executive roles. I get bored quickly and even though I worked for Motorola for twenty years they were kind enough to let me move around the company every few years to serve multiple business units, with different applications, various technologies and eclectic customers' base all over the world. I am very grateful for being accommodated with these opportunities. I started my career in 1978 as an R&D engineers for National Semiconductors, designing the first 32 bit microprocessors in the industry. The product was superior relative to all our competitors at the time. Intel and Motorola surpassed us because they did a better job in all other disciplines that must support a new product launch, such as manufacturing, marketing, sales, quality control, to name a few. This is exactly the moto of this book: It takes more than a good idea to make a commercially successful product. Over the years I participated in different aspects of hundreds of new product learning from successes and mistakes. This book is the collective wisdom from all these experiences, as well as lessons learned from all the smart supervisors, colleagues, subordinates, clients and supporting teams I had the honor to work with.